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    Our research and development teams operate at a global level and generate synergies from our collective expertise and by drawing on related disciplines. We are also constantly exchanging information at an international level with independent technical institutions, key opinion leaders and multipliers in order to be able to ensure cooperation and knowledge management of the highest order. As part of this process, we also conduct extensive research, the results of which we continually present in workshops, at conferences and symposiums - either in documentation or talks given by our cooperation partners - and also publish in renowned scientific journals. This database contains a large number of these evidence-based scientific articles, most of which have been evaluated by independent assessors:

    1. Journal article

      Rapid debridement with monofilament fibre debridement technology:Clinical outcomes and practitioner satisfaction

      Journal of wound care 2019 28(8) 534541

      OBJECTIVE

      To determine the clinical effect and consequential levels of health professionals and patient satisfaction with the results of debridement episodes of wounds with visible slough and/or scaly skin using monofilament fibre debridement technology.

       

      METHODS

      This was a non-comparative, open label evaluation conducted in static/non-healing acute and chronic wounds with visible slough and/or scaly skin that required debridement. Monofilament fibre debridement technology was applied in 1-2 sequential treatment episodes during normal clinical practice which followed local practice, guidelines or formularies. Following the clinical phase of the evaluation, health professionals were invited to complete an online survey of the clinical outcomes and their satisfaction with them.

       

      RESULTS

      Survey questions were answered by 1129 health professionals. Wounds managed using the monofilament fibre debridement technology during this evaluation included leg ulcers (63%), pressure ulcers (10%), dehisced surgical wounds (3%), diabetic foot ulcers (8%) and other wounds (13%). 'Other' wound types included acute dirty wounds, burns, cellulitis, psoriasis, diabetic amputation wounds, dry flaky skin, moisture wounds, trauma, varicose eczema. Of the wounds, 12% were reported as non-static. There was visible change in the wound and/or skin after first use of the monofilament fibre debridement technology in a high proportion of all wound types, and a further increase in the proportion of wounds with visible change after the second use. The visible difference was significant for both static and non-static wounds. User and patient satisfaction with all clinical outcomes were high, whether or not the user and patient had previous experience of monofilament fibre debridement technology.

       

      CONCLUSION

      Monofilament fibre debridement technology provides rapid, visible and effective debridement of slough and scaly skin after one application and further visible improvement after two applications in static and non-static wounds. Health professionals and patients report high levels of satisfaction with outcomes following application of the monofilament fibre debridement technology.

      Products Debrisoft Pad
      PMID 31393801
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    2. Journal article

      Strategien zur Schmerzvermeidung bei Patienten mit chronischen Wunden

      Vasomed 2019 31(4) 161164
      Products Debrisoft Lolly
    3. Journal article

      Endoscopic negative pressure therapy (ENPT) of a post-laryngectomy pharyngocutaneous fistula: first report of a new treatment method

      HNO 2019 67 7779

      In the current first report, it is shown how a post-laryngectomy pharyngocutaneous fistula was successfully closed by endoscopic negative pressure therapy (ENPT; also termed endoscopic vacuum therapy, EVT). The duration of negative pressure treatment was 14 days. Up until now, ENPT has been used for treatment of transmural defects in the rectum and esophagus. The new endoscopic method can also be used in the ENT field for closure of pharyngocutaneous fistulas.

      PMID 31053941
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    4. Journal article

      Iatrogenic esophageal perforation during fundoplication: treatment with endoscopic negative pressure therapy

    5. Journal article

      ReadyWrap®: case studies in practice

      British journal of community nursing 2019 24 2431

      The cost that chronic wound care imposes on both patients and health services worldwide is well recognised. Most patients with venous leg ulcers require compression therapy over the long term, for both treatment as well as to prevent recurrence of these wounds. Caring for patients with chronic wounds makes up a large part of the workload for district and community nurses, and encouraging self-management among patients is a worthwhile effort to limit the costs and resources directed for this purpose. The present article describes the practical use of the ReadyWrap range of compression garments, which are available in various different styles, and aid patients, their families and carers in the self-management of venous leg ulcers. These products are designed with their long-term use in mind, and, as described in the case studies in this article, patients show good concordance to compression therapy involving ReadyWrap.

      PMID 31604036
    6. Journal article

      Endoscopic negative pressure therapy of the upper gastrointestinal tract

      Der Chirurg; Zeitschrift fur alle Gebiete der operativen Medizen 2019 90(1) 16

      Endoscopic negative pressure therapy (ENPT) has been adapted for upper gastrointestinal tract applications. More than 400 patients have already been treated with ENPT due to transmural defects in the upper gastrointestinal tract, with a success rate of 87%. The greatest experience exists for the treatment of anastomotic leakages and perforations of the esophagus. The ENPT is also used in the duodenum, pancreas and for complications after bariatric surgery. There are new indications that go beyond treatment in complication management. Innovative drainage types and endoscopic techniques have been developed that broaden the spectrum of applications. The aim of this article is to give an overview of the current status of ENPT in the upper gastrointestinal tract.

      PMID 30456644
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    7. Journal article

      Biofilm management using monofilament fibre debridement technology: outcomes and clinician and patient satisfaction

      Journal of Wound Care 2019 28(9) 608622

      Objective:

      Best practice in wound bed preparation and biofilm-based wound management includes debridement to create a clean wound bed and to assist in minimising the redevelopment of biofilm. Biofilm that is not removed inhibits healing and redevelops if not prevented from doing so with topical antimicrobial agents. Monofilament fibre debriding technology (MFDT) is used for effective and rapid mechanical debridement of loose material, slough and biofilm. The objective of this evaluation was to determine the clinical effect and consequential levels of health professional and patient satisfaction with the results of a biofilm pathway that included MFDT to achieve debridement.

       

      Methods:

      This non-comparative, open label evaluation was conducted in static and non-static wounds that required debridement. MFDT was used to debride in a two-week evaluation of a biofilm pathway. Wounds were debrided three times in week one and twice in week two. Each debridement was followed by treatment with an antimicrobial dressing. Other care included secondary dressings and compression delivered according to local practice, guidelines and formularies. After the clinical evaluation, health professionals were invited to complete an online survey of the clinical outcomes and their satisfaction with the biofilm pathway.

       

      Results:

      There were 706 health professionals who provided answers to the survey questions. Wound types evaluated were leg ulcers (67.4%), pressure ulcers (10%), dehisced surgical wounds (1.7%), diabetic foot ulcers (7.4%) and other wounds (13.4%). Of the wounds, 9% were reported as non-static despite the eligibility criteria. Not all wounds followed the pathway. The most frequently-used antimicrobial was silver. Non-antimicrobial products used included all-in-one dressings, other secondary dressings and compression. There was a change in 77% of wounds overall after two weeks. Change was reported almost equally for both static and non-static wounds. Health professionals who did or did not follow the pathway were ‘completely satisfied’ or ‘satisfied’ with the overall clinical outcome 96% and 95%, respectively. Of the patients, 77% were ‘completely satisfied’ or ‘satisfied’ with healing after following the pathway, as reported by the treating health professional.

       

      Conclusion:

      The biofilm pathway that includes MFDT appears effective. Wounds managed on the pathway were debrided effectively and healing progressed to the satisfaction of both health professionals and patients.

      Products Debrisoft Pad
      PMID 31513491
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    8. Journal article

      Tips and tricks for endoscopic negative pressure therapy

      Der Chirurg; Zeitschrift fur alle Gebiete der operativen Medizen 2019 90(1) 714

      Endoscopic negative-pressure therapy (ENPT) is becoming a valuable tool in surgical complication management of transmural intestinal defects and wounds in the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract. Innovative materials for drains have been developed, endoscopic techniques adapted, and new indications for ENPT have been found. Based on our broad clinical experience, numerous tips and tricks are described, which contribute to the safety of dealing with the new therapy. The aim of this work is to present these methods. The focus is on describing the treatment in the esophagus.

      PMID 30280205
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    9. Journal article

      Effect of non-adhering dressings on promotion of fibroblast proliferation and wound healing in vitro

      Scientific reports 2019 9(1) 4320

      Non-adhering dressings are commonly used during granulation, tissue formation, and re-epithelialization. Elucidating cytotoxic effects and influence on proliferation/migration capacity of cells like fibroblasts is of interest. Dressings' effects were investigated by comprehensive in vitro approach: (1) MTT assay measuring cell viability after direct contact, (2) ATP assay determining effects on cell proliferation, and (3) scratch wound assay featuring an in vitro wound healing model. One cotton-based dressing with vaseline (vas) was included in the study and four polyester dressings containing vas and technology-lipido-colloid matrix (TLC), carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), hydrocolloid (HC), or glycerin (gly) as additives. A polyamide dressing with vas + CMC and three silicone-based dressings (AT, CC, M) were tested. Polyester + vas + CMC did not negatively affect cell viability or proliferation but it was found that fibroblast layers appeared more irregular with decreased F-actin network structure and tubulin density possibly leading to hampered scratch closure. Silicone AT, polyester + gly and polyamide + vas + CMC caused distinct cell damage. The latter two further reduced cell viability, proliferation and scratch healing. From the overall results, it can be concluded that cotton + vas, polyester + TLC, polyester + vas + HC and the silicone dressings CC and M have the potential to prevent damage of newly formed tissue during dressing changes and positively influence wound healing.

      PMID 30867534
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    10. Journal article

      Examination of the effects of a new compression garment on skin tissue oxygenation in healthy volunteers

      Journal of wound care 2019 28(7) 429435

      OBJECTIVE

      Compression devices have been shown to reduce venous stasis, increase blood flow and skin tissue oxygenation (StO2), promoting healthy tissue. This study aimed to explore the efficacy of a new compression garment in three different positions in healthy adults.

       

      METHODS

      In this quantitative study, potential participants were screened and recruited using the Physical Activity Readiness Questionnaire (PAR-Q, Canada). Participants attended three separate, one-hour sessions to evaluate StO2 in supine-lying, chair-sitting and long-sitting positions. StO2 was recorded for 20 minutes pre-, during and post- a 20-minute intervention using a compression garment, TributeWrap (Lohmann-Rauscher, Germany). A repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was followed by post-hoc pairwise comparisons.

       

      RESULTS

      A total of 28 healthy volunteers took part (aged 24.6 ±8.4years; 13 males, 15 females). A significant difference was seen between the three positions (p<0.001). Chair-sitting had the lowest StO2 pre-intervention, increasing StO2 significantly (32.25%, p<0.001) during wear of the compression garment (24.8% higher than baseline post-intervention). No significant difference was seen between long sitting and supine-lying (p=1.000). In contrast, long-sitting and supine-lying StO2 was higher pre-intervention compared with chair-sitting and only increased post-intervention (11% and 16.8% respectively, p<0.001) compared with baseline.

       

      CONCLUSION

      The compression garment significantly increased StO2 levels in both seating positions. Further studies are required to determine if increasing StO2 through short intervention sessions with this device has the potential to improve self-management of tissue health in individuals with reduced mobility, oedema or venous insufficiency.

      PMID 31295092